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BUSINESS IN SHORT

PAS presents its wish list

THE BUSINESS Alliance of Slovakia (PAS), a lobbying group for employers, has published a list of its members' priorities that it wants the the next government to adopt. Among the most important items on its so-called Wish List 2012 are: macroeconomic stability; a consistent fight against corruption; an improvement in the enforceability of laws; a more effective social system; and improvement of the education system.

THE BUSINESS Alliance of Slovakia (PAS), a lobbying group for employers, has published a list of its members' priorities that it wants the the next government to adopt. Among the most important items on its so-called Wish List 2012 are: macroeconomic stability; a consistent fight against corruption; an improvement in the enforceability of laws; a more effective social system; and improvement of the education system.

Its chief executive, Róbert Kičina, said PAS prepared the list of its members' ten most important requirements – something it does before every general election – in order to focus on improving the business environment, restoring economic growth and creating new jobs.

“Slovakia inevitably needs new reforms,” Kičina stated in a press release, adding that during the previous six years the government had not implemented any reform which had significantly improved the business environment in Slovakia.

“The wish list, aside from the [specific] requirements, also defines basic advice for removing barriers to business,” Kičina added.

Among other priorities listed by PAS were: the need to improve the operation of state administrative bodies; a better summary of state expenditures; the fulfilment of promises made to the European Union; the protection of Czech businesspeople from non-transparent behaviour, and a better approach to businesspeople in the economic development of the country..

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