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Organisers say Gorilla protests will continue

Organisers of the so-called Gorilla protests against political corruption in Slovakia plan to continue organising additional demonstrations, said Peter Pčolinský, one of the organisers, to the TASR newswire.

Organisers of the so-called Gorilla protests against political corruption in Slovakia plan to continue organising additional demonstrations, said Peter Pčolinský, one of the organisers, to the TASR newswire.

“Exact dates of further protests will be specified within the next few days but we will certainly continue,” Pčolinský stated, as quoted by TASR.

He expressed thanks to those who have been supporting the protests and disassociated himself from the disturbances in front of the Government Office on February 3, saying that “they were caused by people who were not with us on SNP square; they had only joined on Námestie Slobody [near the Government Office]”, TASR wrote.

He also rejected responsibility for aggressive behaviour and violence that occurred in front of the parliamentary building during which four police officers were injured and seven people arrested.

Pčolinský said that the rowdiness and clashes with police came after the protest demonstration was officially closed and “the absolute majority of the protesters had left”.

Another organiser, Lucia Gallová, told the Sme daily that she was trying to stop the rowdiness and persuade people not to engage in violence but was not successful.

The organisers also told the media that they have some information that the disruptive people could have potentially been paid by someone in order to divert attention from the content of the protest itself.

Interior Minister Daniel Lipšic praised the police intervention as adequate and well-timed, TASR reported.

“We managed [to handle] the protest with minimum damage and injuries,” the minister said, as quoted by TASR, adding that the absolute majority of people at the protest had behaved in an appropriate and non-violent way.

“Only afterwards, some extremists and football hooligans caused disturbances in Bratislava,” Lipšic stated, as quoted by TASR.

Source: TASR, Sme

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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