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Activists attempt to close doors to parliament using human chain

Civil activist Róbert Mihály, one of the chief figures in the Gorilla Protest, along with around 40 of his associates on Tuesday, February 7, attempted to block access to parliament by means of a human chain. Their attempt, however, was blocked by parliamentary guards.

Civil activist Róbert Mihály, one of the chief figures in the Gorilla Protest, along with around 40 of his associates on Tuesday, February 7, attempted to block access to parliament by means of a human chain. Their attempt, however, was blocked by parliamentary guards.

The group made their attempt after Mihály was prevented by guards from accessing the visitors’ balcony of the parliamentary chamber and told he could watch the debate on a screen in parliament’s cinema hall instead. Mihály described this as a violation of his constitutional rights, before moving to create the human chain, the TASR newswire reported.

He described his protest as Gorilla Protest 2.1, in apparent reference to the second Gorilla Protest held last Friday in the streets of Bratislava, and a third planned Gorilla Protest this Friday. The protesters used shouts such as "Shame!" and "Treason!" in an attempt to get lawmakers to meet them. A few parliamentary employees who had been on their way out of the building at the time of the protest were forced to use side exits.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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