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Parliamentary resolution asking Gašparovič to appoint Čentéš fails to gain majority

Parliament did not approve a resolution on February 8 asking President Ivan Gašparovič to appoint Jozef Čentéš as General Prosecutor. The resolution submitted by Deputy Speaker of Parliament Milan Hort from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) received support from only 68 of 139 legislators present, the SITA newswire reported.

Parliament did not approve a resolution on February 8 asking President Ivan Gašparovič to appoint Jozef Čentéš as General Prosecutor. The resolution submitted by Deputy Speaker of Parliament Milan Hort from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) received support from only 68 of 139 legislators present, the SITA newswire reported.

Hort argued that Čentéš had been properly elected to the post on June 17, 2011 and that the president should ensure standard operation for the General Prosecutor’ Office (GPO) by making the appointment. Hort added that the current situation at the GPO cannot be considered standard or appropriate as Čentéš was duly elected in a secret ballot and fulfils all requirements but Gašparovič has refused to install him in the post.

SITA wrote that Gašparovič has said that Čentéš in not credible for the post and that he also wants to wait for a ruling by the Slovak Constitutional Court on a complaint lodged by former general prosecutor Dobroslav Trnka who claims that parliament had elected him to the post.

Five members of the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) voted for the resolution along with all other members of the caucuses of the outgoing centre-right coalition who were present. MPs from Smer and the Slovak National Party (SNS) either voted against it or abstained.

Most-Híd leader Béla Bugár said he believes that a parliamentary resolution would not force the head of state to appoint Čentéš and added that unless public pressure gets stronger, Gašparovič will not consider a change in his position.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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