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Survey reports 40 percent of Slovaks think there is no honest politician

A pollster reported that Slovaks seem disgusted with politics particularly after the so-called Gorilla file surfaced, with four in five of those polled saying that that politicians mentioned in the file do not have a moral right to run in the forthcoming parliamentary elections. The phone survey was conducted by the WakeUp polling agency from February 6 to February 10 among 1,496 respondents, the SITA newswire wrote based on information provided by Henrieta Bogdalíková of WakeUp.

A pollster reported that Slovaks seem disgusted with politics particularly after the so-called Gorilla file surfaced, with four in five of those polled saying that that politicians mentioned in the file do not have a moral right to run in the forthcoming parliamentary elections. The phone survey was conducted by the WakeUp polling agency from February 6 to February 10 among 1,496 respondents, the SITA newswire wrote based on information provided by Henrieta Bogdalíková of WakeUp.

WakeUp wrote in its new release that more than 40 percent of those surveyed also said that there is no honest politician in Slovakia, a historically high figure.

The impact of the Gorilla file was also visible in responses to the question about which party should be excluded from the March elections, WakeUp said in its release. As many as 25 percent of those polled think the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) should be excluded, followed by Smer (nearly 15 percent) and the Slovak National Party (nearly 11 percent), the polling agency stated.

WakeUp asked two questions in the survey: "In your opinion, do politicians connected with the Gorilla case have the moral right to run in the elections?” and "Which politician do you consider honest?" Nearly 80 percent answered ‘no’ to the first question while 43 percent answered ‘none to the second question and 20 percent did not answer.

The order of politicians considered honest by those polled is as follows: Robert Fico (Smer; 10.6 percent), Béla Bugár (Most-Híd; 5.5 percent), Iveta Radičová (SDKÚ; 5.3 percent), Igor Matovič (Ordinary People; 4.0 percent), Daniel Lipšic (Christian Democratic Movement (KDH); 2.3 percent), Richard Sulík (Freedom and Solidarity (SaS); 1.5 percent), and Ján Figeľ (KDH; 1.3 percent), while other named politicians received less than one percent.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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