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BioEko Tech SK eyes Slovakia

POLISH firm BioEko Tech SK plans to build a plant to make special construction materials in Šaštín-Stráže. Radovan Prstek, the mayor of Šaštín-Stráže, explained that the company decided to do so because of the exceptional quality of the sand in local deposits. The new plant should produce mortars, coatings and other mixtures used in construction, the SITA newswire wrote in mid November.

POLISH firm BioEko Tech SK plans to build a plant to make special construction materials in Šaštín-Stráže. Radovan Prstek, the mayor of Šaštín-Stráže, explained that the company decided to do so because of the exceptional quality of the sand in local deposits. The new plant should produce mortars, coatings and other mixtures used in construction, the SITA newswire wrote in mid November.

BioEko Tech SK’s investment of €2.5 million should be completed within one year and the new plant should employ 25 to 30 people.

According to Prstek, the town sold land in its industrial zone to the investor for a reasonable price. As part of the deal, the investor agreed to remove 20,000 tons of waste which had remained there from earlier production of asphalt mixtures.

Topic: Real Estate


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