Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Radičová: Samsung request for state aid does not meet criteria

A request by Samsung Electronics Slovakia for investment assistance of €28 million does not comply with the criteria for such aid, Prime Minister Iveta Radičová said after a government session on Wednesday, February 22.

A request by Samsung Electronics Slovakia for investment assistance of €28 million does not comply with the criteria for such aid, Prime Minister Iveta Radičová said after a government session on Wednesday, February 22.

The government postponed a decision on whether to provide the Galanta-based company with tax relief. According to Radičová, Slovak and EU regulations in this sphere allow such assistance to be provided only if it is designed to create jobs or is provided to regions with a high unemployment rate. Neither is currently the case for the Samsung application. However, Radičová stressed that Samsung's application had not been dismissed and that the government was ready to provide support to the company if “a new programme involving research activities were involved”.

She also added, as quoted by the TASR newswire, that she was curious whether Samsung would continue to require state assistance every time it uses up previously-allocated investment aid. Samsung filed a request with the Economy Ministry for the current assistance in late September 2011. It stated that the money would support the modernisation of production of new LED TV models and preparation work for new types of 3D, SMART and OLED televisions in the existing plant. TV Markíza reported in November that the South Korean company was considering closing down its plants near Trnava and Galanta (Trnava Region) and moving to Romania. The company denied the reports.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.