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Matovič claims to have passed lie-detector test

Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) party leader Igor Matovič has declared that he underwent a polygraph – i.e. lie-detector – test on Friday, February 17, in London. He claimed that he had passed the test successfully.

Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) party leader Igor Matovič has declared that he underwent a polygraph – i.e. lie-detector – test on Friday, February 17, in London. He claimed that he had passed the test successfully.

Speaking at a press conference held on Thursday, February 23, Matovič said that he answered "no" to four questions: whether he had given a bribe; whether he had received a bribe,; whether he had been offered a bribe; and whether or not he had cheated the state on payments due when importing a printing machine. He said that all politicians running in parliamentary elections more than once should undertake a similar test.

Matovič conceded that there would always be people who would cast doubt on polygraph testing, but claimed that this was only because they were afraid of taking a test. "If anyone wants to ask me any questions vis-a-vis a lie-detector test, I will only accept questions coming from political party chairs or people who themselves will submit to a [lie-detector] test with identical questions," he said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

In reaction to accusations levelled earlier this week by former OĽaNO slate candidates that Matovič had not written his own master's diploma thesis, Matovič replied that he didn't write a single letter. "My hand-written notes were transcribed by a friend's sister during a vacation in Croatia. The whole diploma thesis was authored by me, yet I didn't write a single letter in it," he said.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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