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Penta official comments that context of the Gorilla file is a fiction

Jaroslav Haščák, one of the individuals from Penta financial group mentioned in the so-called Gorilla file said he has visited the flat on Vazovova Street, which has been described as a meeting place between businessmen and politicians of the second government of Mikuláš Dzurinda (2002-2006), only twice and he never met any politicians there, according to an interview conducted by the Sme daily.

Jaroslav Haščák, one of the individuals from Penta financial group mentioned in the so-called Gorilla file said he has visited the flat on Vazovova Street, which has been described as a meeting place between businessmen and politicians of the second government of Mikuláš Dzurinda (2002-2006), only twice and he never met any politicians there, according to an interview conducted by the Sme daily.

“The persons are real, the transactions are real, some connections are real,” Haščák responded when asked whether Gorilla file, the document allegedly made by the Slovak Information Service (SIS) intelligence agency which pertains to the high-level political corruption, is true.

“The context is not real. We did not corrupt any politician or publicly-known person. Not I or anyone from Penta. We did not have a reason to bribe them,” Haščák stated, as quoted by Sme.

He rejected all accusations of corruption, adding that he has not stolen a single euro from the state.

Haščák, one of the owners of the Penta financial group, invited journalists from only some selected media to his press conference, where he explained that he was advised by some of his colleagues not to talk about the case immediately after the Gorilla file surfaced on the internet and that he should wait for better time.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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