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ELECTION 2012: Protest organisers call on Slovak president to postpone election

Because President Ivan Gašparovič does not call general elections he cannot change them either, said the president’s spokesman, Marek Trubač, on February 27 in response to an appeal addressed to the president by organisers of the Gorilla protests earlier in the day to postpone the March 10 election, the TASR newswire reported. "This election will be non-democratic, unconstitutional and amoral ... Cutting the government's tenure short like they did is against the Constitution and unacceptable in a democracy," said Peter Karailiev, a signer of the appeal, quoting the document.

Because President Ivan Gašparovič does not call general elections he cannot change them either, said the president’s spokesman, Marek Trubač, on February 27 in response to an appeal addressed to the president by organisers of the Gorilla protests earlier in the day to postpone the March 10 election, the TASR newswire reported.

"This election will be non-democratic, unconstitutional and amoral ... Cutting the government's tenure short like they did is against the Constitution and unacceptable in a democracy," said Peter Karailiev, a signer of the appeal, quoting the document.

According to the signers of the appeal, a caretaker government should be established to deal with the protesters’ objections and legitimise a new system of elections. Asked what democratic elections should look like, Karailiev only said, as reported by TASR, that this should be decided by public discussion.

The protest organisers' demands were also addressed to Speaker of Parliament Pavol Hrušovský as well as to Slovakia’s ombudsman, Pavel Kandráč, who were asked to seek the Constitutional Court's position on the matter.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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