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ELECTION 2012: Police check authenticity of signatories on 99 Percent registration petition

Any new party that wants to be registered to run in a Slovak general election must collect at least 10,000 signatures from citizens who support its registration. Based on a complaint filed by the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union’s (SDKÚ’s) youth branch, SDKÚ New Generation, the police have started calling people from the signature list presented by the new 99 Percent – Civic Voice party to ask them whether their signatures supporting the founding of the new party are authentic.

Any new party that wants to be registered to run in a Slovak general election must collect at least 10,000 signatures from citizens who support its registration. Based on a complaint filed by the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union’s (SDKÚ’s) youth branch, SDKÚ New Generation, the police have started calling people from the signature list presented by the new 99 Percent – Civic Voice party to ask them whether their signatures supporting the founding of the new party are authentic.

Žilina resident Zuzana Sučíková told police on Tuesday, February 28, that despite her name appearing on the 99 Percent petition she had never signed any document approving its establishment, the Sme daily reported. She was not the only one: Sme reported that at least four other people claimed that they had not signed the list supporting the establishment of the new party.

Ivan Weiss, 99 Percent sponsor and a parliamentary candidate for the party said that its supporters were annoyed that police had contacted them and that he considers the calls “chicanery”. The party promised to comment on the development on Wednesday, February 29, Sme wrote.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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