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Conflicting reports on whether layoffs are imminent at Slovak Post

Smer MP Branislav Ondruš's statements regarding mass layoffs at Slovak Post (Slovenská pošta) are not true, according to the spokesperson for the Labour, Social Affairs and the Family Central Office (ÚPSVaR), the TASR newswire reported. "Slovak Post, which employs almost 15,000 people throughout Slovakia, announced plans to dismiss 44 people on January 18. Nobody has been dismissed so far, however," said ÚPSVaR's Andrea Hajduchová, as quoted by TASR. She added that companies frequently announce mass layoffs to ÚPSVaR but that dismissals in the end affect fewer people – if anybody. "Statistics confirm this," Hajduchová told TASR, noting that companies last year announced the layoffs of 10,515 people but that less than 5,000 were actually laid off.

Smer MP Branislav Ondruš's statements regarding mass layoffs at Slovak Post (Slovenská pošta) are not true, according to the spokesperson for the Labour, Social Affairs and the Family Central Office (ÚPSVaR), the TASR newswire reported.

"Slovak Post, which employs almost 15,000 people throughout Slovakia, announced plans to dismiss 44 people on January 18. Nobody has been dismissed so far, however," said ÚPSVaR's Andrea Hajduchová, as quoted by TASR. She added that companies frequently announce mass layoffs to ÚPSVaR but that dismissals in the end affect fewer people – if anybody. "Statistics confirm this," Hajduchová told TASR, noting that companies last year announced the layoffs of 10,515 people but that less than 5,000 were actually laid off.

"As far as I know there's no internal plan of layoffs at Slovak Post ... so it can get rid of people in a spontaneous fashion," Ondruš said on March 5, stressing that the situation is all the more "tragic" in that it would mainly concern staff with lower education. Ondruš said that he had received what he called official information from the company's top ranks.

"In addition, Slovak Post has notified a local job centre in Banská Bystrica of planned mass dismissals," Ondruš stated, adding that ÚPSVaR is failing to prepare for the action.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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