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Medical rescue workers threaten job action

Medical rescue workers in Slovakia issued a veiled threat to take a job action over a measure valid from February 1 that reduces payments from health insurance companies to the country’s medical rescue services. The Health Ministry, led by Ivan Uhliarik from the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH), had initiated the measure.

Medical rescue workers in Slovakia issued a veiled threat to take a job action over a measure valid from February 1 that reduces payments from health insurance companies to the country’s medical rescue services. The Health Ministry, led by Ivan Uhliarik from the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH), had initiated the measure.

The workers announced that their open letter to Prime Minister Iveta Radičová brought no offer of assistance and they said the prime minister turned a deaf ear to their demands.

"We recommend that the prime minister, the health minister and the president, who should supervise the steps of the outgoing government, to re-evaluate their attitudes towards medical rescuers in the coming days. We also recommend that the representatives of this country consider what would happen if on March 9, 2012, a day before the parliamentary elections, 2,500 rescuers suddenly fell ill and did not come to work", stated the Association of the Medical Rescue Services, as quoted by SITA.

The rescuers said that they face a threat in coming years that they will not be able to support their families with reduced salaries.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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