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ELECTION 2012: Poll reports Smer would win half the seats in parliament

A poll conducted by the Focus agency for Radio and Television of Slovakia (RTVS) found that if the election had been held at the end of February, the Smer party would have captured 39.7 percent of the votes – gaining 75 seats in parliament – followed by the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) with 10.4 percent and 20 seats, the SITA newswire reported.

A poll conducted by the Focus agency for Radio and Television of Slovakia (RTVS) found that if the election had been held at the end of February, the Smer party would have captured 39.7 percent of the votes – gaining 75 seats in parliament – followed by the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) with 10.4 percent and 20 seats, the SITA newswire reported.

The third strongest party in the poll was Most-Híd, with 7 percent and 13 seats followed by two new parties: Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) with 6.7 percent support in the poll and 13 seats; and 99 Percent – Civic Voice with 5.2 percent support and 10 seats. According to the poll two other parties would enter parliament: the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) and Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) both had 5.1 percent support.

Martin Slosiarik of Focus told SITA on March 6 that the poll did not fully reflect the controversy surrounding signatures on the registration petition of the 99 Percent party or reaction to SaS’ leader Richard Sulík’s regular meetings with businessman Marián Kočner to exchange information on political developments.

The well-known parties that polled below the threshold required to reach parliament were: the Slovak National Party (SNS) with 4.7 percent; the Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK) with 3.9 percent; the Free Speech party with 2.5 percent; the Communist Party (KSS); and the Movement for Democratic Slovakia (HZDS).

The poll was conducted between February 21 and 27 on a sample of 1,036 respondents. 14.1 percent of those polled said they would not vote on March 10 and 32.5 percent said they had not decided on their vote or were not willing to tell.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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