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Judicial Council again fails to elect Supreme Court vice-president

Supreme Court president and Judicial Council chairman Štefan Harabin again omitted from the agenda of a Judicial Council session on Thursday, March 8, a vote to select a new Supreme Court vice-president. Harabin justified the decision by saying that only 12 out of 18 council members were present, and it would therefore not be "dignified" to elect his deputy.

Supreme Court president and Judicial Council chairman Štefan Harabin again omitted from the agenda of a Judicial Council session on Thursday, March 8, a vote to select a new Supreme Court vice-president. Harabin justified the decision by saying that only 12 out of 18 council members were present, and it would therefore not be "dignified" to elect his deputy.

"Absentees could object that the election was not democratic, as they were not present," Harabin argued, as quoted by the SITA newswire. The Judicial Council has tried several times to choose the new Supreme Court vice-president, but without success. The Supreme Court has been without a vice-chair since May 30, 2010, when Daniela Švecová's term expired.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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