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ELECTION 2012: Smer is the largest party after 96 percent of votes counted

The Smer party has maintained its position as the largest party in the Slovak parliament following elections held on March 10. Votes have been counted in 96 percent of the election precincts.

The Smer party has maintained its position as the largest party in the Slovak parliament following elections held on March 10. Votes have been counted in 96 percent of the election precincts.

According to the Statistics Office of the Slovak Republic, which has been publishing preliminary results as returns arrive from each precinct, Smer leads with 44.84 percent, followed by the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) with 8.77 percent.

Third is Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) with 8.49 percent, followed by Most-Híd, which has so far received 6.89 percent.

The parties on target to pass the five percent threshold to enter parliament, based on the official preliminary results, include the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) with 5.83 percent and Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) currently at 5.60

The Slovak National Party (SNS) at 4.61 percent and Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK) at 4.46 percent have not made it to parliament.

Source: www.statistics.sk

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