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Slovak Tokaj vineyards damaged by fire

A significant area of Slovakia’s Tokaj vineyards near Čerhov (in Trebišov district, eastern Slovakia) was damaged by fire yesterday afternoon (Wednesday, March 14). Locals and well as volunteer firemen helped extinguish the fire.

A significant area of Slovakia’s Tokaj vineyards near Čerhov (in Trebišov district, eastern Slovakia) was damaged by fire yesterday afternoon (Wednesday, March 14). Locals and well as volunteer firemen helped extinguish the fire.

“Two fire engines with six professional firemen were sent, and helped prevent the fire from spreading to the forest,” Trebišov firefighter Juraj Pastor told the TASR newswire, who said he and his colleagues were called out at 16:35. Pastor added that fires spread to neighbouring houses but these were extinguished. TASR reported that more than 10 hectares of vines were damaged.

Tokaj, also known internationally as Tokay, is a special type of wine produced in just one region of the world, bordering Hungary and Slovakia.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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