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BUSINESS IN SHORT

Chambers set out priorities

THE NEW Slovak government should engage in open and effective dialogue with businesses and incorporate their interests into the preparation of its agenda, according to the list of priorities presented by 13 chambers of commerce operating in Slovakia. The chambers introduced seven basic points which were topped by education, the TASR newswire reported.

THE NEW Slovak government should engage in open and effective dialogue with businesses and incorporate their interests into the preparation of its agenda, according to the list of priorities presented by 13 chambers of commerce operating in Slovakia. The chambers introduced seven basic points which were topped by education, the TASR newswire reported.

“All chambers consider the area of education as one of the most important issues,” said president of the American Chamber of Commerce (AmCham), Igor Kottman, as quoted by TASR. “This is an area to which special attention needs to be paid.”

The chambers also called on the government to establish a standardised system of monitoring the needs of the labour market and to improve the connection between the market and schools.

The second key area where change will be required is in employment and growth, according to the secretary-general of the Slovak-Austrian Chamber of Commerce, Mária Berithová. The government should keep the most important changes to the Labour Code and simultaneously amend the immigration laws, harmonise labour policy and prepare a comprehensive reform of the social security system, TASR wrote.

The chambers also want the state to make some changes in energy policy, the business environment, the system of public procurement, and the enforceability of the law.

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