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Financial Admin files complaint

THE FINANCIAL Administration (FS), which administers Slovakia’s tax and customs systems, has filed a criminal complaint related to the troubled introduction of its new IT system. The complaint will be based on the findings of an inspection carried out by the Supreme Audit Office (NKÚ), which stated that the law on public administration information systems was violated, the TASR newswire reported.

THE FINANCIAL Administration (FS), which administers Slovakia’s tax and customs systems, has filed a criminal complaint related to the troubled introduction of its new IT system. The complaint will be based on the findings of an inspection carried out by the Supreme Audit Office (NKÚ), which stated that the law on public administration information systems was violated, the TASR newswire reported.

“Based on these findings, the Financial Administration submitted a criminal complaint against an unknown perpetrator with the Bratislava I District Police Directorate,” said FS spokesperson Miroslava Slemenská, as quoted by TASR, adding that measures have been adopted that should prevent anything similar from taking place in future.

Meanwhile, the parliamentary committee for finance announced that all the information systems operated by the Financial Administration will be checked by experts from the Slovak University of Technology (STU) in Bratislava. In particular, they are to make an audit of the recently launched but malfunctioning IT system and evaluate whether the FS should revert to using its old system, the SITA newswire reported.

The FS has encountered serious problems over recent weeks due to the malfunctioning of its new IT system. This has led to several sackings, including those of the FS’ general director Igor Krnáč and Competence Centre head Miroslav Mikulčík. The latter formerly led the Tax Directorate, one of the FS’ forerunners, but was sacked from that post last year.

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