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Documentary from RTVS series shortlisted for film festival

THE SLOVAK public-service television and radio broadcaster, RTVS, has prepared a series of documentaries about children and their view of themselves and the life surrounding them, called Deti o deťoch / Children on Children. The series began airing in March and one part, to be broadcast on March 22, has been entered in the finals of an international film festival.

Max, Krištof and Daniel on set.(Source: Courtesy of Furia Film+)

THE SLOVAK public-service television and radio broadcaster, RTVS, has prepared a series of documentaries about children and their view of themselves and the life surrounding them, called Deti o deťoch / Children on Children. The series began airing in March and one part, to be broadcast on March 22, has been entered in the finals of an international film festival.

The competing documentary, Budúcnosť podľa Maxa, Krištofa a Daniela / The Future according to Max, Krištof and Daniel, shows the ideas of three boys aged 10 about how the world will look in 2041. An apocalyptic vision versus optimist utopia, the film takes director (Max), script-writer (Krištof) and cameraman (Daniel) back in time in a self-made teleportation machine. They are able to watch the first films ever made, but also those that do not exist yet. The documentary was written by Alexandra Ševčíková and directed by Jaroslav Vojtek, who both said that the children co-designed the script, props and locations themselves and the crew adapted to their ideas. It has been shortlisted for the 25th year of the film festival for children and youth Prix Jeunesse International, which will take place between June 1 and 6 in Munich, the TASR newswire wrote.

The series, which was made especially for RTVS by Furia Film+ comprises 11 parts and is based on an idea by Tina Diosi and Zuzana Kostelníková. Its various episodes are independent documentaries, made by different filmmakers. The issues dealt with vary from a boy with special talents who feels different, to two dance enthusiasts who sacrifice their childhood for training and competitions, to a Slovak-Arabian girl who has a happy childhood although her family lives in two distant corners of the world, to name but a few.

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