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99 Percent seeks to get election declared unconstitutional

The 99 Percent – Civic Voice party submitted a complaint to the Constitutional Court on Wednesday, March 21, stating that the recent general election was unconstitutional, the TASR newswire reported, citing one of the party’s leaders, Ivan Weiss. According to 99 Percent, a constitutional law whereby public officials can't use themselves, their names or photographs for advertising was violated.

The 99 Percent – Civic Voice party submitted a complaint to the Constitutional Court on Wednesday, March 21, stating that the recent general election was unconstitutional, the TASR newswire reported, citing one of the party’s leaders, Ivan Weiss. According to 99 Percent, a constitutional law whereby public officials can't use themselves, their names or photographs for advertising was violated.

"This law doesn't make any distinction between political and other advertising and applies 365 days a year,” Weiss said. According to him, the extent to which this law was violated must have had an impact on the election results. 99 Percent is also complaining about the way in which the police approached the process of verifying signatures on its party registration petition, some of which, police alleged in the days before the election, were found to be false.

Weiss said the party objected to how Police Corps President Jaroslav Spišiak provided information about the case. "He isn't the body responsible for prosecuting crimes and thus isn't entitled to be informed or give information about the progress of an investigation. He cited information from the investigation files, however," Weiss said, referring to a press conference given by Spišiak on February 29. 99 Percent failed to get any MPs elected to parliament after gaining only 1.58 percent of the votes in the March 10 general election. If the Constitutional Court upholds the party's complaint, 99 Percent said it would demand that the election results be declared invalid and a new election date set.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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