'Good Market' intended to bring community spirit back to Bratislava

A special event aimed at strengthening community ties in Bratislava, the so-called 'Good Market' (Dobrý trh) in Panenska Street, will take place for a second time on Saturday, March 24. The market provides an opportunity for local producers to sell locally-made food, wine, artistic goods, books, antiques and other products.

A special event aimed at strengthening community ties in Bratislava, the so-called 'Good Market' (Dobrý trh) in Panenska Street, will take place for a second time on Saturday, March 24. The market provides an opportunity for local producers to sell locally-made food, wine, artistic goods, books, antiques and other products.

Staré Mesto / Old Town spokesman Tomáš Halán said, as reported by the TASR newswire, that the aim is to bring back a traditional way of shopping, support community spirit and provide an opportunity for locals to meet each other. The first market was a great success, added Old Town mayor Tatiana Rosová.

The stalls will be open on Saturday, March 24, between 10:00 and 16:00. A gypsy-music band will add to the atmosphere with a live performance.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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