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99 Percent party goes to court

THE 99 Percent – Civic Voice party has filed a complaint with the Constitutional Court claiming that the March 10 parliamentary elections were unconstitutional and asking the court to rule the results invalid and order a rerun of the election, the SITA newswire reported.

THE 99 Percent – Civic Voice party has filed a complaint with the Constitutional Court claiming that the March 10 parliamentary elections were unconstitutional and asking the court to rule the results invalid and order a rerun of the election, the SITA newswire reported.

Ivan Weiss, one of the leaders and sponsors of the party, which received only 1.58 percent of the votes, said that the motion with the court alleges two violations of the constitution: actions taken by Police Corps President Jaroslav Spišiak and the involvement of government officials in political advertisements.

“The police action brought massive uncertainty among our voters,” Weiss stated, as quoted by SITA, adding Spišiak had illegally abused the police force by waging an investigation of 99 Percent.

Weiss also argued that during the election campaign, the constitutional law on protection of public interest in performance of public functions was breached by government officials’ active engagement in political advertisements, stating that “a member of parliament or government cannot provide himself/herself, his/her voice, or signature for [political] advertising”.

He gave an example of outgoing Justice Minister Lucia Žitňanská using her official title on campaign billboards, saying that these kinds of advertisements had improperly influenced the results. SITA wrote that Weiss did not mention that Žitňanská’s party, the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), captured only 6.09 percent of the vote.

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