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SARIO schedules trip to attract US investors

Four thousand new jobs and investments worth €350 million are under discussion in tentative talks between the Slovak Agency for Investment and Trade Development (SARIO) and fifteen US companies, the SITA newswire reported, noting that the interest of potential investors from the US is greater than interest of investors from Europe for the first time ever.

Four thousand new jobs and investments worth €350 million are under discussion in tentative talks between the Slovak Agency for Investment and Trade Development (SARIO) and fifteen US companies, the SITA newswire reported, noting that the interest of potential investors from the US is greater than interest of investors from Europe for the first time ever.

Representatives of the Slovak Agency for Investment and Trade Development are now focusing on the US and they have scheduled a working visit there this week to attract potential investors to Slovakia as well as to attend the official opening of the Slovak pavilion in Silicon Valley, the centre of high-tech industry in the US.

SARIO Director General Robert Šimončič commented that many potential investment projects are currently from the US, adding that "we want to present Slovakia in the US as a country destined for research and development investments".

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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