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NEWS IN SHORT

Slovakia has new ombudswoman

JANA Dubovcová, a former judge and MP for the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), has been sworn in as Slovakia’s new ombudswoman. She replaces Pavol Kandráč, who served 10 years in the post, the TASR newswire reported.

JANA Dubovcová, a former judge and MP for the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), has been sworn in as Slovakia’s new ombudswoman. She replaces Pavol Kandráč, who served 10 years in the post, the TASR newswire reported.

The new ombudswoman said she regarded the job as the peak of her career.

“I would like to perform as well as possible in this post, because I think that it is the right thing to do,” Dubovcová said, as quoted by TASR.

When asked about her priorities and challenges, she pointed to undue court delays as well as the need to tackle discrimination.

Dubovcová was nominated by the SDKÚ, along with Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) and Most-Híd. She was elected to the post on December 13, 2011, when 76 out of 140 MPs present at a parliamentary session backed her candidacy.

She withdrew her name from the SDKÚ party list for the March 10 general election following her selection, as the ombudswoman is required to be apolitical.

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