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Peer review of nuclear power plants

AN INTERNATIONAL peer review of the results of stress tests conducted last year on Slovak nuclear power plants was launched on March 26. The review was due to last until March 29, the Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ÚJD) reported on its website.

AN INTERNATIONAL peer review of the results of stress tests conducted last year on Slovak nuclear power plants was launched on March 26. The review was due to last until March 29, the Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ÚJD) reported on its website.

This assessment of the safety of the country’s nuclear facilities by an international expert team is a continuation of the stress tests of nuclear power stations in EU member states as well as other countries that voluntarily agreed to take part, that were prompted by the Fukushima disaster in Japan.

The team of experts evaluating the results of Slovakia’s stress tests was created by the European Commission and consists of experts from Bulgaria, Lithuania, France, Hungary and Italy. It is led by Oskar Grözinger from Germany.

The task of the experts is to check the results which Slovakia set out in its National Report on Stress Tests for Nuclear Power Plants in Slovakia. Within the assessment process the international team got the opportunity to see some of the measures implemented at the site of the nuclear power plant in Mochovce.

The visit will result in an evaluation report based on the experts’ assessment of the stress test results in Slovakia.

The on-site international assessments in individual countries follow sessions involving expert teams held in Luxembourg in February, at which 17 countries operating nuclear power plants presented the results of the stress tests in their countries.

Slovakia's dominant electricity producer, Slovenské Elektrárne, operates two nuclear power plants, each with two reactors, in Jaslovské Bohunice and Mochovce. SE is constructing two additional reactor in Mochovce and these were also assessed as part of the stress tests.

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