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Unplanned power flows analysed

IN RECENT months, the electricity systems of the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia have repeatedly faced critical situations caused by electricity generated in northern Germany.

IN RECENT months, the electricity systems of the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia have repeatedly faced critical situations caused by electricity generated in northern Germany.

Due to a combination of several factors, power has not flowed directly to consumers in southern Germany, Austria or further south in Europe, but instead has gone through the electricity systems of the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary.

These unplanned power flows have caused serious problems. For example, such flows endanger local network security conditions and limit cross-border energy trade, the Slovak Electricity Transmission System (SEPS), which operates the grid in Slovakia, reported on its website.

On March 23, transmission system operators in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia – namely ČEPS, MAVIR, PSE Operator, and SEPS – issued a joint report which analysed the issue of unplanned power flows and provided suggestions for solving what they termed a serious situation.

It analysed the bidding zones in the CEE region and the German-Austrian bidding zone, in the context of the unplanned flows.

The report concluded that resolution of the problem of unplanned power flows depended on the splitting of the current German-Austrian bidding zone. Concurrently, the report provided a number of suggestions for further measures, especially in the context of the common effort to complete the EU’s internal energy market by 2014.

The report also provided a response to a study commissioned by the German national regulatory authority, Bundesnetzagentur, published in October 2011 that stated that splitting the German-Austrian market would not solve the situation, SEPS wrote in its statement.

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