Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

FOCUS SHORT

Unplanned power flows analysed

IN RECENT months, the electricity systems of the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia have repeatedly faced critical situations caused by electricity generated in northern Germany.

IN RECENT months, the electricity systems of the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia have repeatedly faced critical situations caused by electricity generated in northern Germany.

Due to a combination of several factors, power has not flowed directly to consumers in southern Germany, Austria or further south in Europe, but instead has gone through the electricity systems of the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary.

These unplanned power flows have caused serious problems. For example, such flows endanger local network security conditions and limit cross-border energy trade, the Slovak Electricity Transmission System (SEPS), which operates the grid in Slovakia, reported on its website.

On March 23, transmission system operators in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia – namely ČEPS, MAVIR, PSE Operator, and SEPS – issued a joint report which analysed the issue of unplanned power flows and provided suggestions for solving what they termed a serious situation.

It analysed the bidding zones in the CEE region and the German-Austrian bidding zone, in the context of the unplanned flows.

The report concluded that resolution of the problem of unplanned power flows depended on the splitting of the current German-Austrian bidding zone. Concurrently, the report provided a number of suggestions for further measures, especially in the context of the common effort to complete the EU’s internal energy market by 2014.

The report also provided a response to a study commissioned by the German national regulatory authority, Bundesnetzagentur, published in October 2011 that stated that splitting the German-Austrian market would not solve the situation, SEPS wrote in its statement.

Top stories

Car interior or house insulation. What happens with your recycled clothes? Photo

Slovaks throw away 460 kilograms of clothes every ten minutes.

Slovaks throw away a pile of 460 kilograms of clothes every ten minutes.

Kiska: Saková is a wasted opportunity

But he has no other option than to appoint her as interior minister. Opposition and civic initiatives are also critical.

Denisa Saková met with President Andrej Kiska.

Slovak writer and film director Peter Krištúfek dies in a bus crash

The documentarist and writer, aged 44, was one of the two casualties of the fatal Monday crash between a bus and a truck.

Peter Krištúfek

Simulated Mars mission stopped

The crew members struggled with several problems, including serious injury and one member's decision to leave.

Michaela Musilová