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Judges’ work habits to go online

THE JUSTICE Ministry has started publishing online annual statistical reports containing specific details about the work of every judge in Slovakia. Reports about all judges will have to be published by the end of April, ministry spokesperson Peter Bubla told the SITA newswire.

THE JUSTICE Ministry has started publishing online annual statistical reports containing specific details about the work of every judge in Slovakia. Reports about all judges will have to be published by the end of April, ministry spokesperson Peter Bubla told the SITA newswire.

The obligation to publish reports was passed by parliament as part of the second package of changes affecting the judiciary prepared by the departing justice minister, Lucia Žitňanská.

Each report will have to contain information about the number of unfinished cases, the number of new cases, the number of days spent at work and at proceedings, as well as the steps that court chairs have made to improve the work of individual judges.

Bubla explained that the reports will be important for each judge’s final evaluation, which will examine the effectiveness of their work and review the management of their whole court.

“If the evaluation is negative it can mean a disciplinary proceeding against the judge [in question], and repeated unsatisfactory evaluation [can result in them] leaving the judiciary,” Bubla said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

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