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Bratislava and Oslo connected by air

REGULAR scheduled flights between Bratislava and the Norwegian capital, Oslo, were launched on March 28. It is the first direct connection between the two cities, the TASR newswire wrote.

A Norwegian airline started flying to Bratislava.(Source: TASR)

REGULAR scheduled flights between Bratislava and the Norwegian capital, Oslo, were launched on March 28. It is the first direct connection between the two cities, the TASR newswire wrote.

“The airline company Norwegian Air Shuttle will operate flights between Bratislava and Oslo two times per week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays,” said Tomáš Kika of M. R. Štefánik Airport in Bratislava, hoping that the new route will prove interesting for tourists as well as business travellers.

Considering the amount of Norwegian investment in Slovakia, Bratislava Airport believes that the planes will be occupied in both directions.

The Norwegian low-cost airline has transferred one of its routes from Vienna to Bratislava. It also plans to transfer all its Copenhagen-Vienna flights to Bratislava as of May. Vienna Airport is about 65 kilometres from Bratislava.

Norwegian Air Shuttle is the third largest low-cost airline in Europe, flying about 13 million passengers a year on its fleet of 59 aircraft, servicing 261 routes to 100 destinations. During the 2012 summer season it plans to launch a total of 34 new lines.

Topic: Transport


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