Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

FOCUS SHORT

Cargo rail fined for market abuse

THE SUPREME Court has confirmed a decision by the Antitrust Office (PMÚ) to fine the state-owned freight rail company, Železničná Spoločnosť Cargo Slovakia, for abuse of its dominant market position. As a result, the company paid a fine of €2.489 million on March 22. The court’s ruling ended a case that had been dragging on for nearly six years, the SITA newswire wrote.

THE SUPREME Court has confirmed a decision by the Antitrust Office (PMÚ) to fine the state-owned freight rail company, Železničná Spoločnosť Cargo Slovakia, for abuse of its dominant market position. As a result, the company paid a fine of €2.489 million on March 22. The court’s ruling ended a case that had been dragging on for nearly six years, the SITA newswire wrote.

The PMÚ decided in July 2006 that the freight rail company Železničná Spoločnosť Bratislava – and its legal successor Železničná Spoločnosť Cargo Slovakia – had abused its dominant position in 2004-2005 and violated the law on protection of economic competition. The authority imposed a Sk75 million fine (€2.489 million) on the company.

The PMÚ argued that the conduct of Cargo forced cement producer Holcim (Slovensko) to terminate cooperation with the shipping companies LTE Logistik and Transport Slovakia. This occurred because Cargo withdrew from price-setting agreements it had struck with the two companies, which provided freight rail transport services to Holcim (Slovensko).

“As a result of this conduct, LTE was excluded from the relevant market of transporting bulk cement on the line between Rohožník and Devínska Nová Ves, on the state border,” the antitrust office explained.

Cargo had acted in this way because Holcim had signed a direct contract on rail transport of bulk cement with LTE, a rival of Cargo, SITA reported. Previously, Cargo itself provided this service to the construction materials producer through a forwarding company.

Topic: Transport


Top stories

Suicide game does not exist and visa-free regime for Ukrainians is not a lie

The Slovak Spectator brings you a selection of hoaxes from the past two weeks.

There is no computer game that makes people commit suicides.

It’s not easy being an ‘alien’ in Slovakia

Are Slovaks scared of foreigners? The stories of those who are trying to make their homes here suggest that ignorance and bureaucratic inertia, rather than fear, cause more problems.

Dealing with state offices may be difficult and time-demanding.

President Kiska uses train for first time Photo

After criticism from coalition MPs for flying and a troublesome car trip, Slovak President Kiska to commute to Bratislava by international train, boarding it in his hometown of Poprad.

President Kiska gets off the IC train in Bratislava.

What has remained here after Stoka, Propeller or Cvernovka? Photo

The book BA!! Places of Living Culture 1989-2016 brings authentic accounts about 38 independent cultural spots in Bratislava.

Blaho Uhlár, founder of the Stoka theatre, in front of the theatre in 2006.