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Permanent exhibition honours Slovak painter Dominik Skutecký

THE CENTRAL Slovak Gallery in Banská Bystrica has opened a permanent exhibition of works and artefacts by famous Slovak painter Dominik Skutecký in the house where he used to live on Horná Street to mark his birth on February 14, 1849.

Three Golden Hairs at the puppet theatre.(Source: Ondrej Synak)

THE CENTRAL Slovak Gallery in Banská Bystrica has opened a permanent exhibition of works and artefacts by famous Slovak painter Dominik Skutecký in the house where he used to live on Horná Street to mark his birth on February 14, 1849.

Katarína Baraníková and Zuzana Majlingová, who developed the idea, told the SITA newswire that they want to complete the exhibition and have it communicate more about the artist's life. Various works are displayed in the painter’s original studio space on the first floor, from studies showing his process of creating an artwork to some of his finished works. The installation has descriptions, photos and documents from family archives and a virtual tour showing the context of Skutecký’s life and work.

The first permanent exposition of this renowned painter was established in his family villa in 1994, showing not only the context of his life but also the fate of his family of Jewish origin.

The gallery intends to interpret the genius loci of what it calls Dominik Skutecký Villa to the public through various cultural events, as the museum also maintains an adjacent garden area. The gallery also plans to present an online version of his works.

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