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Metalurgia employees ready to protest over unpaid salaries

Most of the employees of Dubnica nad Váhom (Trenčín Region) firm Metalurgia were planning to protest today (Wednesday, April 11) in front of the company's headquarters in an effort to obtain unpaid salaries and improve their "unbearable" working conditions, the TASR newswire reported.

Most of the employees of Dubnica nad Váhom (Trenčín Region) firm Metalurgia were planning to protest today (Wednesday, April 11) in front of the company's headquarters in an effort to obtain unpaid salaries and improve their "unbearable" working conditions, the TASR newswire reported.

"The main reason for the protest is Metalurgia's failure to pay out salaries to some employees," said Pavol Adámek from the OZ KOVO trade union, adding that some people had not even received salaries for November. "The company does this in a funny way – by alternating: it pays salaries to some but not to others," Adámek said. He explained that he believes the company's philosophy is that when some employees are happy to have received their salaries, mass protests will not take place. "But the problem has grown considerably and employees want to express their dissatisfaction," Adámek added, promising a turnout of around 200 protesters, representing the majority of the company's labour force.

In addition, the trade union is also complaining about poor working conditions and an alleged failure to observe safety regulations. According to Adámek, the company does not provide employees with the necessary protective equipment, work clothes or hygiene kits.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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