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HISTORY TALKS...

The first trams in Košice

THIS PICTURESQUE colourised postcard dates back to the early 1920s and captures the city centre of Košice. It would not be easy to determine the period of the postcard without seeing the tram.

THIS PICTURESQUE colourised postcard dates back to the early 1920s and captures the city centre of Košice. It would not be easy to determine the period of the postcard without seeing the tram.

Horse-drawn trams were introduced in Košice as early as in 1891 and two years later the city added a steam-driven tram. The track ran from the railway station through the city centre to Črmeľ. But in 1909 the steam-driven tram service was discontinued due to financial trouble.

The city launched construction of additional track two years later and on February 28, 1914, tram services started again using the original track as well as several new sidetracks that were added. Very little is known about tram transport in Košice in the period immediately after World War I or during the 1938-45 Hungarian occupation. But it is obvious that it was vital to Košice one hundred years ago and today many trams continue to criss-cross the city.

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