Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Indonesian students learning how to grow wheat at Nitra university

Five Indonesian students are learning how to grow wheat at the Slovak Agriculture University in Nitra, the TASR newswire reported. The visit by Indonesian students that started this week is the result of cooperation between Nitra University, two agricultural supply companies, Osivo Zvolen and Solary Istropolis, and Andalas University in Indonesia. According to Peter Bielik, the university rector, Indonesian students will take part in a basic programme on growing wheat, conducted in English. The programme is designed to provide know-how in growing special types of grains suitable for Indonesia. The Indonesian Ambassador to Slovakia, Harsh Edwan Joesoef, said the need to grow wheat in Indonesia stems from globalisation.

Five Indonesian students are learning how to grow wheat at the Slovak Agriculture University in Nitra, the TASR newswire reported.

The visit by Indonesian students that started this week is the result of cooperation between Nitra University, two agricultural supply companies, Osivo Zvolen and Solary Istropolis, and Andalas University in Indonesia. According to Peter Bielik, the university rector, Indonesian students will take part in a basic programme on growing wheat, conducted in English.

The programme is designed to provide know-how in growing special types of grains suitable for Indonesia. The Indonesian Ambassador to Slovakia, Harsh Edwan Joesoef, said the need to grow wheat in Indonesia stems from globalisation.

"Polls have confirmed that an increasing number of inhabitants of our country like pasta, pizza and bread. So, we have to import wheat for their production," the ambassador stated, as quoted by TASR.

In 2011, experimental wheat crops were sown in Indonesia by experts from Osiva Zvolen, with company director Rudolf Zajac considering the October harvest as successful, adding that wheat can be grown even in tropical climates and can be harvested twice a year in Indonesia.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).