Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Interior minister delays in announcing head of Slovak police

Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák does not yet want to confirm media reports that the post of the president of Slovakia’s Police Corps will be filled by its former vice-president Stanislav Jankovič, the TASR reported after a cabinet meeting on April 18. Kaliňák said he is waiting for the outcome of an investigation in which Jankovič is accused of abuse of public office while holding the vice-president's post.

Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák does not yet want to confirm media reports that the post of the president of Slovakia’s Police Corps will be filled by its former vice-president Stanislav Jankovič, the TASR reported after a cabinet meeting on April 18.

Kaliňák said he is waiting for the outcome of an investigation in which Jankovič is accused of abuse of public office while holding the vice-president's post.

"He has a problem that you all know about and I have bought a little extra time to see whether the outcome of the investigation will be positive or negative. If it's negative then the answer is clear," Kaliňák said.

The interior minister went on to say that even if Jankovič is cleared in the investigation he will still need to take a polygraph test.

"That could tell us whether in terms of work within the Police Corps this issue presents a problem or not," the minister explained.

Jankovič, who in 2009 set up a special traffic unit with the aim of catching speeding drivers, is accused of stepping in to help entrepreneur acquaintance Jan Božík who broke the speed limit. When Božík refused to pay a fine of €400, police officers from the unit set up by Jankovič took away his driving license. Jankovič, however, allegedly retrieved Božík’s license the following day.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.

Blog: Foreigners, get involved

What about making our voices heard? And not only in itsy-bitsy interviews about traditional cuisine and the High Tatras.

Regional election 2017