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Justice minister and judges discuss withdrawal of salary discrimination lawsuits

Justice Minister Tomáš Borec said he is ready to apologise to judges who complained about salary discrimination if they withdraw their lawsuits, according to an interview with the Sme daily.

Justice Minister Tomáš Borec said he is ready to apologise to judges who complained about salary discrimination if they withdraw their lawsuits, according to an interview with the Sme daily.

At least 700 judges have sued the state asking for compensation of about €70 million, saying they received lower salaries than their colleagues from the former Special Court. Borec said he considers the judges’ demands immoral but understands why the judges might feel discriminated against since the Special Court was established as court where ‘fair judges who could not be bribed’ worked, Sme wrote.

The Association of Judges of Slovakia said it will not accept the out-of-court agreement proposed by Borec, noting that an apology as a form of compensation is not sufficient.

The association wants to summon a round table to discuss their demands with the Justice Ministry. They suggested using the money to modernise technical equipment in the courts while adding that some judges might also insist on personal financial compensation.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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