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Gašparovič will not boycott Yalta

PRESIDENT Ivan Gašparovič will travel to Ukraine for a summit of central and eastern European countries being held in Yalta despite the fact that several of his counterparts have already announced they will boycott the meeting over the jailing and alleged mistreatment of Ukraine’s former prime minister, Yulia Tymoshenko.

PRESIDENT Ivan Gašparovič will travel to Ukraine for a summit of central and eastern European countries being held in Yalta despite the fact that several of his counterparts have already announced they will boycott the meeting over the jailing and alleged mistreatment of Ukraine’s former prime minister, Yulia Tymoshenko.

“On the issue of the jailing of Ms Tymoshenko the president does not want to be a judge but he expects that Ukraine will do its best [to see] that the trial was fair and in line with standards of international law,” said presidential spokesman Marek Trubač, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

The spokesman added that the president is convinced that an open and frank dialogue with Ukraine rather than rejection of communication is the best form of presenting opinions, comments and reservations about developments in the country.

The German, Austrian and Czech heads of state have announced that they will not take part in the summit. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has also announced that her visit to Ukraine during the Euro 2012 football tournament in June is linked to the fate of Tymoshenko, SITA wrote.

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