Brussels criticises Slovak Telekom and its parent company

The European Commission has announced that it has sent objections to Slovak Telekom, as well as its parent company Deutsche Telekom AG, pertaining to their actions towards several wholesale broadband markets in Slovakia, the TASR newswire reported.

The European Commission has announced that it has sent objections to Slovak Telekom, as well as its parent company Deutsche Telekom AG, pertaining to their actions towards several wholesale broadband markets in Slovakia, the TASR newswire reported.

The executive branch of the European Union has concluded, albeit on a preliminary basis, that Slovak Telekom “has breached Article 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) that prohibits the abuse of a dominant market position”.

“At this stage, the Commission takes the view that Slovak Telekom may have refused to supply unbundled access to its local loops and wholesale services to competitors, and may have imposed a margin squeeze on alternative operators by charging unfair wholesale prices, in breach of EU antitrust rules,” reads the EC press release. “Deutsche Telekom may be liable for the conduct of its subsidiary.”

The companies are expected to respond to the statement of objections within three months, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

The Knihotaxi runs every Friday, Saturday and Sunday in Bratislava.

‘Book Taxi’ – new service to sell old books launches

Novels need not end up in trash, says company behind scheme.


24. jun
Culture Minister Natália Milanová of OĽaNO on June 22, 2022.

New media laws could allow politicians to intervene more in output

Media ownership and funding should also become more transparent.


23. jun

News digest: Salvator pharmacy will resume its original function

Bratislava marks the 280th anniversary of Maria Theresa's coronation, what to do with unwanted books, and decommissioning a former nuclear plant might take longer than planned.


24. jun
SkryťClose ad