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Hradecký: Current crisis is encouraging Europe's extremists and neo-Nazis

The movements that unleashed World War II are growing amidst the current economic crisis, which is also strengthening extremist and neo-Nazi groups in Europe, secretary of the Slovak Anti-Fascist Fighters Association (SZPB) Roman Hradecký remarked on May 8, the day marking victory over fascism, the TASR newswire reported. Consequently, along with the celebrations and remembrances of WWII soldiers, SZPB aims to draw attention to the need to face fresh risks, he added.

The movements that unleashed World War II are growing amidst the current economic crisis, which is also strengthening extremist and neo-Nazi groups in Europe, secretary of the Slovak Anti-Fascist Fighters Association (SZPB) Roman Hradecký remarked on May 8, the day marking victory over fascism, the TASR newswire reported. Consequently, along with the celebrations and remembrances of WWII soldiers, SZPB aims to draw attention to the need to face fresh risks, he added.

"It's not only here ... but when it comes to the global crisis in general, extremist neo-Nazi forces that are attempting to trivialise WWII and are trying to push for the very same ideology that led to WWII," Hradecký said of the current phenomenon. He noted that the SZPB is co-organising a number of commemorative events between May 7 and 9. The ceremonies culminate with a wreath-laying at Bratislava's main war memorial, Slavín, today (Wednesday, May 9). Nearly 7,000 Soviet soldiers who were killed during the liberation of Bratislava in April 1945 are buried at Slavín.

May 8, the Day of Victory over Fascism, isn’t only a commemoration of the liberation of Czechoslovakia by the Red Army, as the Communists used to state, but a celebration of the victory of all nations who took part in the anti-Hitler coalition, Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) MP Martin Fronc said, as reported by TASR. “I view the victory as it was – a victory for the Allies. Nobody would have achieved it alone: not Russia, nor the Americans, the British or the French, if they hadn't worked together as allies. The defeat of this monstrous system and the horrors [that it represented] is worth remembering and a tribute to all who fought [in the war],” Fronc said.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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