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New passenger car registrations rose 2.1 percent in April

In April, 5,794 new passenger cars were registered in Slovakia, a rise of 2.1 percent year-on-year. By contrast, sales of small utility vehicles up to 3.5 tonnes dropped by 11.09 percent from a year ago to 409, the SITA newswire wrote. Over the first four months of this year, 22,392 passenger cars were registered in Slovakia, an increase of 4.77 percent year-on-year, Pavol Prepiak, the vice-president of the Association of Slovak Automotive Industry (ZAP), reported.

In April, 5,794 new passenger cars were registered in Slovakia, a rise of 2.1 percent year-on-year. By contrast, sales of small utility vehicles up to 3.5 tonnes dropped by 11.09 percent from a year ago to 409, the SITA newswire wrote. Over the first four months of this year, 22,392 passenger cars were registered in Slovakia, an increase of 4.77 percent year-on-year, Pavol Prepiak, the vice-president of the Association of Slovak Automotive Industry (ZAP), reported.

Skoda remained the best selling car brand in Slovakia with a 25.01-percent market share. After Skoda came Volkswagen (9.37 percent market share), Kia (7.37 percent), Renault (5.84 percent), and Hyundai (5.5 percent). A little over half the cars registered, 52.96 percent, were petrol-engined and 47.03 percent were diesels.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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