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Former interior minister comments on slander suit against police president

Former interior minister Daniel Lipšic said that the lawsuit against outgoing Police Corps President Jaroslav Spišiak over his statements regarding the case of Karol Mello is shameful. The lawsuit was filed by three former members of the Office for the Fight against Organised Crime, Ivan Šefčík, Milan Lučanský and Jozef Mičieta, who claimed that by criticising their work on the Mello case Spišiak had committed slander, the TASR newswire reported.

Former interior minister Daniel Lipšic said that the lawsuit against outgoing Police Corps President Jaroslav Spišiak over his statements regarding the case of Karol Mello is shameful. The lawsuit was filed by three former members of the Office for the Fight against Organised Crime, Ivan Šefčík, Milan Lučanský and Jozef Mičieta, who claimed that by criticising their work on the Mello case Spišiak had committed slander, the TASR newswire reported.

These former police officers specifically objected to Spišiak’s statement that Mello, accused of organising the double murder of a boy and a woman in a village near Bratislava in 2004, remained at large while they were still members of the office. The outgoing police president had also added that Mello was arrested once these individuals left the police.

Lipšic noted that Mello had been arrested in October 2010 after Spišiak assumed his police post.

“Mello did remain at large during the tenure of the former Police Corps officials,” Lipšic stated, as quoted by TASR, adding that it is absurd to take someone to court over a true statement.

Lipšic also pointed to a relationship between the complaining former police officers and the head of the special department of the Office of the General Prosecutor, Peter Šufliarsky, saying that “if this is happening simply because somebody has a yachting buddy at the Office of the General Prosecutor, then I view it as a serious transgression and shameful”, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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