Slovakia’s GDP rose by 3.1 percent in Q1 2012; employment up 0.6 percent

Slovakia’s Statistics Office released its flash estimate of the country’s GDP for the first quarter of 2012 on May 15 and reported real GDP increased by 3.1 percent compared to the same quarter in 2011. After seasonal adjustment, GDP rose by 3.2 percent compared to the first quarter of 2011 and by 0.8 percent in comparison with the fourth quarter of 2011. GDP in current prices in the first quarter of 2012 reached €16.558 billion, an increase of 4.5 percent compared to last year’s first quarter.

Slovakia’s Statistics Office released its flash estimate of the country’s GDP for the first quarter of 2012 on May 15 and reported real GDP increased by 3.1 percent compared to the same quarter in 2011. After seasonal adjustment, GDP rose by 3.2 percent compared to the first quarter of 2011 and by 0.8 percent in comparison with the fourth quarter of 2011. GDP in current prices in the first quarter of 2012 reached €16.558 billion, an increase of 4.5 percent compared to last year’s first quarter.

Total employment in the quarter was 2,212,200 people and had increased by 0.6 percent from the first quarter of 2011. Seasonally adjusted total employment rose by 0.7 percent in the first quarter of 2012 compared with the first quarter of 2011 and by 0.2 percent compared to the previous quarter.

These flash estimates of gross domestic product and total employment will be updated and reported again on June 6.

Source: Statistics Office of the Slovak Republic

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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