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FOCUS SHORT

Jobseekers told to get creative

ACCORDING to a survey by the Kariera.sk website, as reported by the SITA newswire, Slovak jobseekers often fail to present themselves to a prospective employer in a positive light especially when it comes to their curriculum vitae. Too often applicants resort to copying CV formats off the web, sometimes word for word.

ACCORDING to a survey by the Kariera.sk website, as reported by the SITA newswire, Slovak jobseekers often fail to present themselves to a prospective employer in a positive light especially when it comes to their curriculum vitae. Too often applicants resort to copying CV formats off the web, sometimes word for word.

Petra Pohanková of the personnel agency Start People said that in general Slovaks do not “sell” themselves properly when looking for work.

“Our best advice to jobseekers is to spend some time thinking about how their past performance and adaptability in previous employment will predict success in the position which they seek,” said Pohanková.

The survey reported that 19 percent of jobseekers describe themselves as “communicative” while noting other overworked adjectives such as “flexible” and “responsible.” The attributes of “discretion,” “empathy” and “tolerance” are rarely used, the survey noted.

Topic: Career and HR


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