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Slovak film wins award in Houston

THE SLOVAK black comedy Mŕtvola musí zomrieť (The Corpse Must Die) received international recognition with an award at the 45th WorldFest International Independent Film Festival held last month in Houston, Texas.

Director Paštéka wins platinum.(Source: Courtesy of WorldFest)

THE SLOVAK black comedy Mŕtvola musí zomrieť (The Corpse Must Die) received international recognition with an award at the 45th WorldFest International Independent Film Festival held last month in Houston, Texas.

The movie, written and directed by Jozef Paštéka and co-produced by Trigon Productions and Slovak public broadcaster STV, was released in 2011. The movie won a Platinum REMI after it was screened at the festival on April 21, the Pravda daily wrote.

“The very fact that the movie won an award in America is very satisfying for me. Of course, the great reaction of the audience in Houston, telling me after the screening they liked the film made me happy too,” said Paštéka, as quoted by Pravda.

When receiving the award, Paštéka thanked the producer, his family and Alenka Spustová, the film editor, for their patience, according to Iveta Pospíšilová of Trigon Productions.

Pravda also wrote that producer Patrik Pašš appreciated the good reception the film has found in festivals in various countries, including Lithuania, Poland, Brazil and Romania as well as Paštéka’s dedication in travelling to Houston at his own expense to receive the award.

The film premiered last September in the Slovak town of Piešťany, at the Cinematik International Film Festival. Its cast includes well-known Slovak and Czech actors such as Veronika Žilková, Miroslav Noga, Peter Marcin and Ľubomír Paulovič.

“This award shows that it is hardest to be successful at home, as Slovak cinema-goers, unlike television audiences, did not give the film much support; but festival committees and juries have been captured by it,” Pašš stated, as quoted by Pravda.

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