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USA wants Slovak special forces to stay longer in Afghanistan

The United States would welcome it if the Slovak Parliament extended the mandate of the Slovak special forces active in the ISAF operation in Afghanistan, American Ambassador to Slovakia Theodore Sedgwick said during a meeting with Defence Minister Martin Glváč on Thursday, May 31.

The United States would welcome it if the Slovak Parliament extended the mandate of the Slovak special forces active in the ISAF operation in Afghanistan, American Ambassador to Slovakia Theodore Sedgwick said during a meeting with Defence Minister Martin Glváč on Thursday, May 31.

The Slovak Special Unit is currently operating under a mandate for three rotations. Glváč, however, confirmed that parliament is set to discuss the extension of this mandate in the near future. At the moment, a second group of members of the Fifth Special Task Force Regiment from Žilina is deployed in Afghanistan for six months. It attracted media attention recently by apprehending a Taliban leader affiliated with the Al-Qaeda terrorist network.

"I'm glad that our soldiers are working towards a good reputation for Slovakia. Every positive reference from abroad about their performance in operations serves to improve public opinion at home," said Glváč, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Slovak soldiers and 40 of their US Army counterparts, plus specially shipped-in equipment, are due to take part in joint special forces training at the Lešť training camp in central Slovakia starting today, June 1.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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