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Nitra’s regional government’s deputy president resigns

The deputy president of the Nitra Self-Governing Region, Vladislav Borík, resigned from his post after being accused by the police ten days ago of manipulating three public procurements used to select firms to provide services to the regional government, the Sme daily reported.

The deputy president of the Nitra Self-Governing Region, Vladislav Borík, resigned from his post after being accused by the police ten days ago of manipulating three public procurements used to select firms to provide services to the regional government, the Sme daily reported.

Borík, together with another five persons were charged by Slovak police on May 24. Though he originally said that he would resign from his post at that time as well as leave Smer party, which had nominated him to the position, he changed his mind and said he wanted to continue serving as the deputy president of the Nitra Region.

The spokesperson for the Nitra Self-Governing Region, Stanislav Katrinec, told the media that if Borík had not resigned his dismissal would have been proposed by Smer deputies in the regional parliament.

Borík’s resignation was submitted to the president of the Nitra Region, Milan Belica, who had already submitted a proposal for Borík’s dismissal to the regional parliament.

Source: Sme

For more information about this story please see: President of Nitra Region proposes his deputy’s dismissal

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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