Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Fair-Play Alliance concerned about opening Slovakia’s Freedom of Information law

Several non-governmental organisations are worried that Slovakia’s law on access to public information, the so-called Freedom of Information act, might be weakened, the Sme daily wrote on June 5, saying that Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák wants to open the law for parliamentary discussion.

Several non-governmental organisations are worried that Slovakia’s law on access to public information, the so-called Freedom of Information act, might be weakened, the Sme daily wrote on June 5, saying that Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák wants to open the law for parliamentary discussion.

The ministry told Sme that it only wants to include text from a European Union directive from 2003 on the right of people to public information, stating that Brussels is pressuring Slovakia because it has failed to incorporate text from the directive into its national law after almost ten years.

Peter Kunder of the Fair-Play Alliance, a political ethics watchdog group, told Sme that the EU directive can be passed as a separate law and the organisation is calling on citizens to sign a petition against the law’s opening by parliament. The petition has received 100 signatures thus far but at least 500 are needed, according to the NGO.

The alliance said that if the ministry opens the law for discussion, MPs would make more changes – ones that could curb the accessibility of information – and due to a lack of time, the ministry would not be able to stop these kinds of amendments.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.