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Transparency International criticises Slovakia for its fight against corruption

The non-governmental organisation Transparency International (TI) has criticised Slovakia for not doing enough to fight corruption. On Wednesday, June 6, TI published a report on corruption risks in 25 countries; it wrote that determination to suppress and reveal corrupt practices has weakened not only in Slovakia, but also in Hungary and the Czech Republic.

The non-governmental organisation Transparency International (TI) has criticised Slovakia for not doing enough to fight corruption. On Wednesday, June 6, TI published a report on corruption risks in 25 countries; it wrote that determination to suppress and reveal corrupt practices has weakened not only in Slovakia, but also in Hungary and the Czech Republic.

Emília Sičáková-Beblavá of Transparency International Slovensko said, as quoted by the Hospodárske Noviny daily, that they did not take into consideration what scandals Slovakia faced but instead concentrated on whether institutions in Slovakia are able to curb corruption. Anti-corruption measures in Slovakia are at a normal European level only on paper and their implementation in practice is far from effective, the organisation suggested.

Source: Hospodárske Noviny

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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