Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Analysis: Slovak jobs have moved from agriculture to services over past 10 years

The Slovak labour market changed considerably over the ten years to 2010, employing more people with a university education and witnessing a significant shift in employment from production to services, reads an analysis published by consulting and research company Trexima Bratislava.

The Slovak labour market changed considerably over the ten years to 2010, employing more people with a university education and witnessing a significant shift in employment from production to services, reads an analysis published by consulting and research company Trexima Bratislava.

According to the analysis, entitled 'Employment Trends in Slovakia 2000-10', the agricultural sector saw the steepest decline in its workforce and, conversely, commerce, gastronomy and tourism reported the biggest gains, the TASR newswire reported. The production sector, including agriculture, industry, construction and energy, which provided jobs for 46 percent of the active population 12 years ago, employed 39 percent of economically active Slovaks in 2010. Employment in agriculture, animal production and fishing fell by 50,000. Textiles, garments and leather processing also showed a 3-percent drop in the overall labour force (by 60,000). Further decreases have been reported in the sectors of food processing, pulp and paper, glass processing, pottery, metallurgy and ironworks, among others.

Commerce, marketing, gastronomy and tourism sectors experienced the opposite trend, with employment in these areas growing by 110,000 staff during the same period. The analysis points out that the proportion of university-educated people in the labour market rose by 8 percent, while 2 percent fewer workers had only basic education in 2010.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

It's not your Slovakia, Bystrica protesters told Kotleba

President Andrej Kiska spoke to the crowd at the protest gathering, asking Slovaks what kind of country they want to have.

Lajčák gives two versions of the Evka story

The Foreign Ministry gives opposing statements about suspicious procurement related to the Slovak Presidency over the EU Council.

Government of PM Robert Fico (left) endorses Lajčák as its official candidate.

PM Fico: Investors should clearly declare whether they have encountered corruption or not

Representatives of the biggest investors in Slovakia met with Fico to discuss the local business environment.

PM Robert Fico meeting with representatives of big investors in Slovakia.

Blog: HR Marketing: Not everybody can be Google!

It is important to know who your target audience is and the position you aspire to achieve as an employer on the market.

Illustrative stock photo