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Nitra Region parliament recalls its deputy president

The deputy president of Nitra Region’s self-government, Vladislav Borík from Smer party, was removed from office after he was accused of tampering with public tenders, the Sme daily reported.

The deputy president of Nitra Region’s self-government, Vladislav Borík from Smer party, was removed from office after he was accused of tampering with public tenders, the Sme daily reported.

The regional parliament took action on June 25 after the police started investigating him in connection with three tenders for services for the regional government that the police said were manipulated.

Borík was replaced by Juraj Horváth, another Smer nominee. After being accused in May, Borík first said he would resign from his post and also from party membership, but then changed his mind and only left the political party, leading the parliament to vote on removing him.

Seven people have been accused of crimes in the tenders, including two other Nitra Region government officials, the Sme daily wrote. Only one businessman is currently in custody.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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